Holy Site

The Basilica of Annunciation

The basilica is one of the world's most holy Christian Liturgical, built on the traditional site of the annunciation by the Angel Gabriel of the birth of Jesus. The central grotto is believed to have been the home of Mary.

The basilica was built in 1969 on the site of crusader and Byzantine remains. This church is a must for almost any Catholic and Orthodox pilgrims.

Israel Capernaum

At Capernaum – known as Jesus’ “own town” (Matt. 9:1) – “walking where Jesus walked” takes on a thrilling new meaning. As you sit on the stone benches of Capernaum’s ancient synagogue, you’ll be reminded that right here, Jesus taught (Mark 1:21; John 6:59) and healed a man possessed by an evil spirit (Mark 1:23-27).

Bethsaida

Jesus clearly knew Bethsaida well (Matt. 11:21). Early Christian travelers also knew the town, just north of the Sea of Galilee, which was home to Peter, Andrew and Philip (John 1:44) and, according to tradition, Zebedee and his sons. It was also scene of the feeding of the 5,000 according to Luke (9:10-17) and of Jesus’ healing of a blind man (Mark 8:22-26).

Israel Church of The visitation

The village of Ein Karem has had a long Association with John the Baptist, being his reported town of birth.

This church honors the visit paid by Mary, Jesus' mother, to Elizabeth, John's mother. As this is the point at which Mary poured forth her song of praise, the Magnificat, the church is beautifully decked out with tiled representations of that canticle in just about every known language.

Luke Chapter 1

Church of The Holy Sepulchre

Easily the most celebrated, yet most contentious, church in Christendom, the Holy Sepulchre contains the traditional sites of the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus under one roof.

The site was rediscovered in the corner of the western forum of the Hadrianic city Aelia Capitolina by Queen Helena, Constantine's mother, who knocked the temple down and built a huge basilica, which was dedicated on Easter day in the year 326.

The Coenaculum

The Coenaculum is the traditional place of the "upper room," where the Last Supper was held. The crusaders, being literalists, made sure their chapel was on the second-story of the building and "David's tomb" was subsequently installed below. It is also associated with the room belonging to John Mark's mother in which the disciples were baptized in the Holy Spirit, but this is difficult to verify.

Ein Karem

Nestled in the terraced hills southwest of Jerusalem is the village of Ein Karem, where picturesque lanes lead you to the traditional spot where Elizabeth “felt life” when she met her kinswoman Mary, and where John the Baptist was born and raised.

Luke 1:39 tells us that after the annunciation, Mary hurried to “a town in the hill country of Judah” to visit Elizabeth, who was also pregnant. Centuries ago, Christians began to mark Elizabeth’s hometown at Ein Karem, whose name means “spring of the vineyard.”

Via Dolorosa

The Via Dolorosa, the road Jesus walked from the place of Pontius Pilate’s sentencing to Golgotha, means “way of sorrows.” The beautiful hymn that begins “On a hill far away...” has led many to picture this last road as a pastoral, quiet scene, a path wending its way, perhaps among old olive trees, up a mountain to where crosses stand starkly against the sky.