Jewish Customs and Terms

Sukkot
Sukkot, or Feast of Booths, is celebrated from the 15th through the 21st of the Hebrew month of Tishrei (usually October), and is one of the three pilgrimage holidays, on which Jews made pilgrimages to the Temple in Jerusalem
Rosh Hashanah
Rosh Hashanah, commonly referred to as the Jewish New Year, is observed on the first and second days of the Hebrew month of Tishrei, which coincides with late September and early October
Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, is the holiest day in Judaism. It is a day of fasting and prayer that is celebrated on the 10th of the Hebrew month of Tishrei
Shavuot
Shavuot (lit. weeks) marks the giving of the Torah on Mt. Sinai. The holiday is celebrated exactly seven weeks after the first day of Passover, which marks the Exodus itself
Pesach
Pesach, or Passover, is a major Jewish holiday and one of the three Jewish pilgrimage holidays
Mimouna
On the evening after the seventh day of Pesach, which is a holy rest day, Jews of North African origin, particularly Morocco, celebrate Mimouna as part of the Pesach festivities
Hanukkah (Chanukah)
Unlike most of the major Jewish holidays, Hanukkah’s origin is not in the Bible, but rather in events that happened later. This is a holiday that lasts eight days and begins on the 25th of the Hebrew month of Kislev (usually in December)
Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, is the holiest day in Judaism. It is a day of fasting and prayer that is celebrated on the 10th of the Hebrew month of Tishrei
Tishrei: Month of Festivals
Tishrei, the first month of the Jewish year, offers time for both reflection and joy. When making a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, there’s no better time of the year than Tishrei (Sep.-Oct.) to gain insight into many ancient traditions